An Indefinite Terrain; Trixie, The Hague

Brigitte Louter

The invitation read: “A confrontation of a man with speeding uprise of technology and existing in the sarcastic post-postmodern world has led to the condition when one no longer finds it bearable to exist in the society overpowered by the hyper real. With the explosion of digital media one finds it hard to relate back to their own body, land, nature. A longing for not the past, but the times when mind, body and nature weren’t in mutually abusive relationships has crystalized in the very essence of this exhibition. By relating on natural materials and strong storytelling the selected artists attempt to claim back what’s theirs – the physicality of their body; the authenticity of their touch, breath, brushstroke; the utter connection to planet Earth and earthly beings.”

Brigitte Louter
Brigitte Louter
Brigitte Louter

Come on, folks! Not again this stumbling, quasi-international language! Either write it in poetry or just say what you want.

Brigitte Louter
Emma van Noort

An Indefinite Terrain was a very short running exhibition last weekend at Trixie.

Iliada Charalambous
Iliada Charalambous
Iliada Charalambous

The general mood was one of defiance, challenging present day society which keeps you constantly busy with its obtrusive and indeed unnecessary requirements.

Iliada Charalambous; background, left to right: Debbie Young, Emma van Noort, Brigitte Louter
Debbie Young

Here were six artists, Katerina Sidorova, Iliada Charalambous, Gijsje Heemskerk, Debbie Young, Emma van Noort and Brigitte Louter, who tried to recapture their independent minds against the odds.

Iliada Charalambous
Iliada Charalambous
Emma van Noort
Emma van Noort

Former show room Trixie seems to be just the right place for it.

Emma van Noort
Katerina Sidorova

The show itself, as well as many of the works, were characteristically makeshift, as if exhibiting, and indeed making art, has become a matter of hit and run in these post-postmodern times.

Gijsje Heemskerk
Gijsje Heemskerk
Gijsje Heemskerk

In itself that is fine as it shows developments and basic ideas.

Gijsje Heemskerk
Gijsje Heemskerk

The danger is that works become too transient to be really meaningful.

Top to bottom (sic): Iliada Charalambous, Katerina Sidorova
Katerina Sidorova
Debbie Young

And if it is hit and run, i’d suggest to hit harder as i’m sure you can!

© Villa Next Door 2019

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Trixie, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Freedom, The fifty key Dutch art works since 1968; Museum de Fundatie, Zwolle

I did not visit Museum de Fundatie in Zwolle to write a review for Villa La Repubblica about the exhibition Freedom as it was during my holidays. However, as it happened to be an extraordinary show i decided to write a review anyway. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

Erik van Lieshout

As i didn’t plan to write a review i only made a few pictures just for the fun of it, so what you see here is not really representative of the experience as a whole.

Navid Nuur

All the more reason to go there and see it all for yourself!

Navid Nuur
Melanie Bonajo
Melanie Bonajo
Michael Tedja
Michael Tedja
Seymour Likely

Marlene Dumas
Natasja Kensmil
Marcel van Eeden
Marcel van Eeden
Maria Roosen
Folkert de Jong
Folkert de Jong
Folkert de Jong
Marc Mulders
Marc Mulders

Click here to read the review in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch)

Atelier Van Lieshout

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the artists, the owners and to Museum de Fundatie, Zwolle

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #87

This building is said to be the oldest in Oude Molstraat (though by far not as old as the street itself which dates from the Middle Ages).

It was built during the first half of the 17th century (whether 1598 marks the start of the building is not clear), with later alterations.

Originally it had a stepped gable, which was changed later.

The shop front was added probably in the 1870s.

It is a state monument.

© Villa Next Door 2019

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Ingrid Simons, Dämmerung (Twilight); Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

Ingrid Simons (1976) presently shows paintings at Livingstone Gallery.

She mainly paints landscapes.

Although the landscape seems to be just a vehicle for expressive painting with sometimes heavy impasto in abstract compositions, she retains the depth of a landscape in her works.

She is especially fascinated by the blue hour just before sunrise and the twilight after sunset.

At the gallery is also a new book for sale about her work, with a text by amongst others Rick Vercauteren and an introduction by yours truly.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Ingrid Simons and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Klaas Gubbels, Tafels, Tables, Tische, Tavoli; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

The still-life has always been a genre of thought and reflection.

Klaas Gubbels, at 85, shows some works at Livingstone Gallery in which especially the table, the base of many a still-life, plays an important role.

The different parts of his still-lives make an abstract composition on one hand, but also become new characters on the other hand.

It all depends on the way he paints them.

The way of painting – the brushwork, the colours, the proportions – always dictates the compositions and the meaning.

In the end these are not just depictions of tables and what may be on and around them, they are abstract works of painterly thought.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Klaas Gubbels and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Jeroen Eisinga, Expeditie Eisinga; Electriciteitsfabriek, The Hague

Nightfall (2018)

For those who missed it (and for those who didn’t) here are some pictures of Expeditie Eisinga (Eisinga Expedition) in the Electriciteitsfabriek (the Power Plant).

Any work shown in this impressive industrial building has to compete with it.

So, works shown in this building – which is still waiting for the artist who is able to tackle its demanding and overwhelming character – must be monumental and must preferably move and make, if possible, some noise.

Nightfall

Six works by Jeroen Eisinga (1966) were indeed competing with the Carceri-like experience of the old power plant.

Sehnsucht (2002)
Sehnsucht

Little else can be said than that his last work Nightfall, which got the main stage, is indeed a masterpiece.

The video, lasting nearly an hour and screened more than life size, gives a bitterly cold impression of sheep in a snow storm at an ice hole with dead sheep.

Nightfall

At the same time it is a very recognisable scene of mourning and consolation.

Personally i was very much moved by it.

Gerdinand & Corline (1996)
Gerdinand & Corline
Gerdinand & Corline
Gerdinand & Corline
Gerdinand & Corline
Nightfall and Gerdinand & Corline
Gerdinand & Corline

Four other great films were shown in the main hall of the building, two of them, Gerdinand & Corline and The Sixth Sense, from the 1990s, with less concentration on just one scene.

Sehnsucht
Sehnsucht
Sehnsucht
Sehnsucht

As a scene, Sehsucht (Desire) showing the decay of a dead zebra, is not that original (a decomposing zebra was already shown in Peter Greenaway’s 1985 film A Zed & Two Noughts), but the setting on a black and white chequered floor, its successive sequences from three positions, and the relatively ‘slow’ movement of the film make it quite special.

The Sixth Sense (1994)
The Sixth Sense
The Sixth Sense
Nightfall
Nightfall
Springtime (2010-11)
Springtime
Nightfall, Springtime and The Sixth Sense

Of course Eisinga’s famous bees movie Springtime was there as well.

Soysambu (2002-19)

The colour movie Soysambu was shown in a smaller room and has quite a different character.

Soysambu

It is more or less the ‘making of’ movie of Sehsucht and is as such the most controversial film of the six, with a bewildering mix of European and African sentiments ending with the almost ritual burning of the zebra carcass; but it is also a film about Europeans in Africa, busy with logistics, money, technique doing something while Africans are helping.

Soysambu

But helping what?

Soysambu

Still, watching  the whole film, it turns from a documentary to a more moving level, just by documenting.

Nightfall and Springtime

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all the photographs courtesy to Jeroen Eisinga and the Electriciteitsfabriek, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #86

Richly decorated neo-renaissance façade, Balistraat.

It was designed by architect Johan Mutters (1858-1939) in the 1880s.

The big door originally gave access to a courtyard with stables and a coach house.

Today these have been redesigned into apartments along a small courtyard (not visible in these pictures).

The two round medallion-like embellishments over the door originally had protruding horse head decorations.

© Villa Next Door 2019

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/