Art in corona times 100. Albrecht Genin, Ocean Stories; Various artists, By the Power of Omission; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

French postmodern philosopher Jacques Derrida (1930-2004) famously paid attention to the importance of margins around texts and the space in between the words.

However, visual artists have always been aware of what is and is not in between the words and in the margins since medieval times.

Texts are not just words that can be embellished with illustrations; they are visual entities themselves that provoke visual reactions.

To Albrecht Genin (1945-2013) texts – not just in the shape of words, but also of music scores and even cash books – were an important source of inspiration.

As far as a book page or a letter are products of the human mind, Genin was one of those artists who take that a step further, as if one way of imagination calls for another.

Presently Genin’s drawings are on show at Livinstone Gallery in an astonishing abundance.

Every scribbled page has become a new story under Genin’s hands.

Indeed, each of his works is worth a close examination.

They are not just products of imagination, they also invite the viewer to use his/her own imagination.

The stories are not just his, they are yours if you take a close look at them yourself.

Ruri Matsumoto

The gallery also shows a preview of its presentation at Art Rotterdam, which has been postponed to May because of this winter’s Corona lockdown.

Ruri Matsumoto
Raquel Maulwurf
Raquel Maulwurf

There are works by the well known names of the gallery, amongst others Ruri Matsumoto (1981), Raquel Maulwurf (1975), Harry Markusse (1990) and Aaron van Erp (1978).

Harry Markusse
Ruri Matsumoto
Aaron van Erp

Amongst them are some recent surprising paintings by Van Erp he already showed in an exhibition last autumn at the gallery, which show ominous beach scenes that seem to echo the current era.

Aaron van Erp

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the artists, the estate of Albrecht Genin and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

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Art in corona times 3. Jan Wattjes, White Noise & Ryan Mendoza, Welcome in America; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

Jan Wattjes (wall), Raquel Maulwurf (floor)

In January i attended the opening at Livingstone Gallery of its present exhibitions of works by Jan Wattjes (1981) and Ryan Mendoza (1971).

Jan Wattjes

Jan Wattjes

By now that seems ages ago, so i decided to see under which conditions i could visit the gallery.

Jan Wattjes

Jan Wattjes

I had already seen that the exhibition had been extended over the month of May.

Jan Wattjes

Jan Wattjes

There were no other restrictions for a visit than the usual ones under the circumstances.

Jan Wattjes

Not having seen each other since the pre-corona era, we had of course lots to discuss, as both the gallerist and me don’t need much stimulus to talk.

Jan Wattjes

In March the gallery had taken part in VOLTA, New York and some of the works shown there still stood packed in the gallery, three works by Raquel Maulwurf (1975) making a good counterpoint to Jan Wattjes’ wonderful pentaptych.

Adriaan Rees

Wattjes’ paintings in which both surface and space play an important – even monumental – role, contrast with some other works also on show which more or less deal with the human condition of the artist.

Ryan Mendoza

In the adjoining space are some paintings and drawings by Mendoza on show.

Ryan Mendoza

Ryan Mendoza

Talking about the human condition of the artist, Mendoza’s works are especially about the human condition of man in general and in America in particular.

Ryan Mendoza

Raquel Maulwurf, Ryan Mendoza

Mendoza’s works share the space with Maulwurf’s bathtub, part of her exhibition last winter.

Jan Wattjes

© Villa Next Door 2020

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

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Raquel Maulwurf, Night Fall; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

Carbon is our friend and foe.

It is the main substance of the material with which Raquel Maulwurf (1975) makes her drawings with which she gives the viewer an almost sublime experience.

The carbon in her charcoal and black chalk creates the darkness of the universe in which stars or whole galaxies light up, or the nocturnal rolling waves of a deep ocean without any signs of life.

However, she also shows the material itself which is being burned to give us heat and light.

Carbon as it is mined as coal, has taken thousands or even millions of years to be formed, while we may change it into smoke and ashes in less than a day, and polluting our environment when doing so.

Also charcoal, Maulwurf’s main material, is the result of burning wood, destruction by fire.

This dualistic quality is also in her present show at Livingstone Gallery where she shows installations and both monumental and smaller drawings in an impressive ensemble.

© Villa Next Door 2020

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Raquel Maulwurf and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

VILLA NEXT DOOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY ADVERTISING ON THIS PAGE!!