Harold de Bree, SSIXS; HOK Gallery, The Hague

Harold de Bree (1966) presently shows some works on copper at HOK gallery, The Hague’s smallest commercial gallery.

As usual there is a military link to De Bree’s work.

In the background you’ll hear short wave radio codes spoken and other sinister radio noises which are clearly not meant to be understood by a nosy listener.

That is probably also the best way to appreciate these copper works: copper as a conductive metal on which codes are splashed and painted, even engraved, on which the changing light also brings a kind of sinister visible noises.

Codes disguised as neat abstract paintings.

But i must admit i like the paintings apart from all that.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Content of all photographs courtesy to Harold de Bree and HOK Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Katrein Breukers & Lily Lanfermeijer, I Laughed “To Hell With Them” I Said; Billytown, The Hague

In Billytown’s Kitchen Katrein Breukers and Lily Lanfermeijer have created a crime scene.

Reminiscences of what might have happened are there, but to reassure you, there are no traces of bloodshed.

The scene is based on amongst others detective stories and the Cluedo detective game.

Some aspects may refer to earlier events, but you may as well find yourself in your own detective story.

And, as said before, there is nothing to worry about.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Billytown, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, There is only one art … L-if-E; Billytown, The Hague

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge (1950) seems to be a bit of a blind spot in modern and postmodern art history.

Genesis P-Orridge is generally seen as one of the founders of Industrial music with his bands Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV.

Already by the end of the 1960s he founded the artist’s collective COUM Transmissions.

Genesis P-Orridge has been active ever since, preferably in co-operation with likeminded people, to seek the extremes of existence and indeed of aesthetics in music, art and design.

Billytown has given Grauzone a platform to organise a retrospective exhibition about Genesis P-Orridge’s work.

Art historically long overdue though the exhibition might be, the relatively peaceful white cube-like presentation which isolates every individual work from its context may not fully confront the visitor with the overwhelming impact of the aesthetics of the work and life of the artist and his many collective projects.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Genesis Bereyer P-Orridge, Grauzone and to Billytown, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #84

Façade of Praktijkschool De Poort (Practice School ‘The Gate’), 2de Sweelinckstraat corner Lübeckstraat.

The school was built in 2014 with classrooms for practice on the ground floor and for theory on the second floor.

Built in a late modernist style the edifice is not really a highlight of present day architecture, but despite its eclecticism it looks quite friendly, it even shows some elegance and it is well situated in the neighbourhood.

© Villa Next Door 2019

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Manfred Schneider, Helio Trope Sleep; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

Livingstone Gallery has a modest but interesting presentation of an installation and mainly text works by Manfred Schneider (1959).

The phrases in the text works seem to be a hotchpotch of disconnected profundities and ironic remarks, splinters of the human condition.

(IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT WE MAKE OURSELVES PRETTY)

Of two bigger paintings one has phrases in the first-person singular and the other in the third-person singular, commenting artists’ life.

(LOVE IS COLDER THAN DEATH)

Modest as the exhibition is, the idea of language and its meaning and feeling expands from the purely visual language of the installation, along the paintings to a video in which jokes about artists are told in two different ways.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Manfred Schneider and to Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Aaron van Erp, The Drawings 1998-2018; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

Livingstone Gallery presently celebrates Aaron van Erp (1978) and especially his drawings.

Some of the drawings are made on brown wrapping paper which gives Van Erp the opportunity to extra accentuate white and some bright colours, a bit like Jheronimus Bosch in the dark scenes of his apocalyptic fantasies.

 

Aaron van Erp 05a

However Bosch’s monsters have turned into common present day, somewhat balding men, accompanied by the achievements of postmodern leisure society.

Aaron van Erp 06a

 

Constant struggle, violence and self-inflicted disaster seem to be the only aim of day to day consumer life, presented by Van Erp with a strong sense of humour and without bitterness.

They are the laughing nightmares of painting and drawing history.

Additional to the drawings there are some paintings on show as well in which Van Erp puts his subjects in a sometimes hallucinating light and dark.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Content of all photographs courtesy to Aaron van Erp and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Yani Chuang, Anatole de Benedictis & Joncquil, Found Footage; Heden, The Hague

Making an exhibition with three artists is quite a venture, especially if all three show personality in their works.

Yani Chuang
Yani Chuang
Joncquil
Anatole de Benedictis

Often the works of two artists seem to communicate while the third gets isolated in one way or another.

Joncquil
Joncquil
Joncquil

Heden made a show with works by Yani Chuang, Anatole de Benedictis and Joncquil in which this doesn’t happen.

Yani Chuang
Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis

The works are concentrated in the two main exhibition rooms, but they are also presented in the rest of the gallery, more or less embedded in Heden’s collection.

Joncquil

Anatole de Benedictis

Indeed all three artists need space.

Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis
Joncquil
Joncquil

They were brought together as they make use of found objects, found footage if you wish.

Yani Chuang
Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis

Chuang, who graduated last year from the Royal Academy in The Hague (KABK), takes chairs in different types and styles as her starting point.

Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis

She transforms them into sculptural characters and even gives them individual names.

Yani Chuang
Yani Chuang
Anatole de Benedictis

Her works function as a kind of beacons in the show.

Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis

It will be interesting to see how her work will develop.

Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis
Anatole de Benedictis

De Benedictis already graduated some years ago and his work has very much grown since.

Anatole de Benedictis
Joncquil
Yani Chuang

In his drawings rigorous precision and a clear graphic pencil line are his hallmarks.

Yani Chuang
Yani Chuang
Yani Chuang

Their  ‘coolness’, completed by objects that reflect the subjects of the drawings, seems to mask a world of falling and rising, including the pains, the joys and the discrepancies.

Yani Chuang
Yani Chuang
Joncquil

Joncquil’s world has expanded gradually octopus-like with the different interests and different disciplines he incorporates in his practice, of which painting, film and on-the-spot happenings are not presented in this show.

Joncquil
Joncquil
Joncquil

But, well, art is always ‘happening’ the moment you see it anyway, especially in Joncquil’s case.

Joncquil
Joncquil

Heden’s choice to make this rich and expanding show with these three artists is a very happy one indeed.

Joncquil

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the artists and to Heden, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #83

House in a row of façades, built around 1900, Laan van Meerdervoort.

Today there are apartments, but until some years ago there was a lawyer’s office annex art gallery (De blauwe leuning / The Blue Handrail).

The regularity of the row of façades has been destroyed completely by failed modernist, utilitarian shop fronts.

© Villa Next Door 2019

All pictures were taken in March 2017

 

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Paul Neagu, Anthropocosmos; PARTS Project, The Hague

I visited PARTS Project to write a review about the present show with works by Paul Neagu (1938-2004) for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

As i have written quite extensively in VLR about the exhibition, i leave you here with some impressions without comments, except for the fact that you really shouldn’t miss this show.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Courtesy to the estate of Paul Neagu, all owners of the works and PARTS Project, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Sebastian Gögel, Grote straat (Large Straight / Great Street); Hoorn & Reniers, The Hague

German painter Sebastian Gögel (1978) presently has a show at Hoorn & Reniers.

Undeniably Gögel is a painter in the German tradition (which is a much longer and richer tradition than most Dutch art viewers seem to realise).

Painting itself in Europe is an act in which tradition weighs heavily on one’s shoulders.

So if you really want to be a good painter you must take that for granted, whether you like it or not.

Gögel seems to be well aware of that; he survives it and builds his own work on top of it.

His work has very much matured since it was last seen in this city about a decade ago.

Some echoes of the Neuen Wilden of around 1980 are clear in this exhibition, also in his combining of the figurative and the abstract.

But there is a big difference as the sense of life has changed radically since the 1980s.

Today we live in a post-almost-everything culture in which Gögel has chosen to fly the banners of painting, not to be stubbornly traditional or to vehemently jump on the brakes of time, but clearly because it is (probably at least to him) the self-evident way of expression.

The German aspect is especially in the constant battle between content and composition, between imagination and expression.

There are some exceptionally fine portraits on show, but the exhibition on the whole has a lot more to offer, so it is warmly recommended as far as i’m concerned.

© Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Sebastian Gögel and Hoorn & Reniers, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters