Petra Strahovnik and Ensemble Modelo62: disOrders 1, Through the Looking Glass; Trixie, The Grey Space, Haagse Kunstkring, PARTS Project, Galerie Helder, The Hague

Klára van de Ketterij at Trixie

Through the Looking Glass is the first part of the two-year disOrders project by composer Petra Strahovnik and performed by members of the Ensemble Modelo62.

Klára van de Ketterij at Trixie

Last weekend three-hour sessions were held by different instrumentalists each in one of five different locations, dealing each with one of five so-called mental disorders: ADHD, anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder and autism.

Klára van de Ketterij at Trixie

Having seen them all at Trixie, the Grey Space in the Middle, Haagse Kunstkring, PARTS Project and Galerie Helder, I must admit it leaves me with the idea that all performances were more or less autistic.

Klára van de Ketterij at Trixie

Whether it was percussionist Klára van de Ketterij (ADHD) running around a collection of drums and other percussive instruments, cellist Jan Willem Troost (anxiety disorder) grappling with his instrument and his environment, or electric guitarist Santiago Lascurain (depression) in his bathtub with dirt, they all showed an extremely meticulous dedication to what they were doing within the sheer unbreakable walls of their supposed conditions, for three whole hours.

The Grey Space

The performance by clarinettists Enric Sans Morera and Jorge López García (bipolar disorder) and the one by trumpeter Justin Christensen (autism) were even quite similar in ideas of expression: experiments with water and plastic in combination with the unexpected properties of their instruments.

Jan Willem Troost at The Grey Space

In the case of the depression performance, the expression was almost too literal, with the performer covering himself in black mud, and even while the guitar was only playing a slowly transforming sound by itself, one could call it a melodramatic performance.

Jan Willem Troost at The Grey Space

In the anxiety act the public was invited to use a triangle now and then, but what influence that had on the performance was hard to see.

Jan Willem Troost at The Grey Space

Was it an invitation to ease the tensions with the sound of the triangle or an invitation to be cruel to the performer with an unexpected sound?

Santiago Luscarain at Haagse Kunstkring

A confronting perspective is, of course, the fact that sufferers of these so-called disorders have to cope with it every day and night in all circumstances and not just for three hours.

Santiago Luscarain at Haagse Kunstkring

In the mean time one must be completely un-self-reflective or even narcissistic (!!) not to realise that we all have bits of these disorders in ourselves, in spite of the fact that most of us are thought to be ‘normal’.

disorders
Santiago Luscarain at Haagse Kunstkring.

They do not just confuse our brains, but may also make us cope with confusing or disturbing situations or stimulate dedication and creativity.

Santiago Luscarain at Haagse Kunstkring

The fact that autism can be most associated with all five acts, is maybe because art itself needs complete dedication both to the whole and to the detail and complete surrender to the performance, whether one is making music or a painting or whatever.

Enric Sans Morera & Jorge López García at PARTS Project

As for the five acts, as said they each lasted three hours which is quite a superhuman effort by the performers.

Jorge López García at PARTS Project

They performed for three hours for four days, and must have practiced and prepared for many hours.

Enric Sans Morera at PARTS Project

That in itself and the co-operation between the composer, the performers, the five art platforms and everybody technically and psychologically involved is a great job.

PARTS Project

In spite of that it should be said that none of the performances were artistically interesting enough to follow for three hours (or maybe that depends on one’s own disorder?).

Justin Christensen at Galerie Helder

Also the question asked by the composer “Can we find compassion in order to expand our concept as a society of what is ‘in order’?” may be a relevant question generally, but do these acts stimulate any answers or reflections on the subject?

Justin Christensen at Galerie Helder

And if they do, are they doing so implicitly or too explicitly?

Justin Christensen at Galerie Helder

Either the question may be too wide-ranging, or the performances need more (yes even more!) aesthetic reflection.

Justin Christensen at Galerie Helder

©Villa Next Door 2019

Contents of all photographs courtesy to all performers and art spaces.

Bertus Pieters

 

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An Indefinite Terrain; Trixie, The Hague

Brigitte Louter

The invitation read: “A confrontation of a man with speeding uprise of technology and existing in the sarcastic post-postmodern world has led to the condition when one no longer finds it bearable to exist in the society overpowered by the hyper real. With the explosion of digital media one finds it hard to relate back to their own body, land, nature. A longing for not the past, but the times when mind, body and nature weren’t in mutually abusive relationships has crystalized in the very essence of this exhibition. By relating on natural materials and strong storytelling the selected artists attempt to claim back what’s theirs – the physicality of their body; the authenticity of their touch, breath, brushstroke; the utter connection to planet Earth and earthly beings.”

Brigitte Louter
Brigitte Louter
Brigitte Louter

Come on, folks! Not again this stumbling, quasi-international language! Either write it in poetry or just say what you want.

Brigitte Louter
Emma van Noort

An Indefinite Terrain was a very short running exhibition last weekend at Trixie.

Iliada Charalambous
Iliada Charalambous
Iliada Charalambous

The general mood was one of defiance, challenging present day society which keeps you constantly busy with its obtrusive and indeed unnecessary requirements.

Iliada Charalambous; background, left to right: Debbie Young, Emma van Noort, Brigitte Louter
Debbie Young

Here were six artists, Katerina Sidorova, Iliada Charalambous, Gijsje Heemskerk, Debbie Young, Emma van Noort and Brigitte Louter, who tried to recapture their independent minds against the odds.

Iliada Charalambous
Iliada Charalambous
Emma van Noort
Emma van Noort

Former show room Trixie seems to be just the right place for it.

Emma van Noort
Katerina Sidorova

The show itself, as well as many of the works, were characteristically makeshift, as if exhibiting, and indeed making art, has become a matter of hit and run in these post-postmodern times.

Gijsje Heemskerk
Gijsje Heemskerk
Gijsje Heemskerk

In itself that is fine as it shows developments and basic ideas.

Gijsje Heemskerk
Gijsje Heemskerk

The danger is that works become too transient to be really meaningful.

Top to bottom (sic): Iliada Charalambous, Katerina Sidorova
Katerina Sidorova
Debbie Young

And if it is hit and run, i’d suggest to hit harder as i’m sure you can!

© Villa Next Door 2019

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Trixie, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters