Façades of The Hague #82

Façade of apartment block ‘t Catshuys, Jacob Catsstraat corner Parallelweg, built in the mid 1980s in the then prevailing unassuming style: too cheap to be really inspiring or playful.

The name derives from the villa Catshuis (Cats House), the official residence of the Dutch prime minister in a more prosperous part of town. The Catshuis was built for Jacob Cats (1577-1660; a poet, lawyer and influencial politician) after whom this street (Jacob Catsstraat) was named.

So the name ‘t Catshuys for this block in a high density area is intended as a humorous hint to that residence.

© Villa Next Door 2019

All pictures were taken in March 2017

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Façades of The Hague #81

Façade of a city residence, in Lange Voorhout.

In the 17th century Baron Van den Boetzelaer, who signed the command to lift the protection of the De Witt brothers, which led to their cruel murder, lived here.

In the early 18th century it was redesigned and rebuilt more or less to its present state by an unknown architect in a prestigious late Louis XIV style.

During the second quarter of the 18th century it was owned by the Anglo-Dutch Stephanus Laurentius Neale, who introduced coffee cultivation in the Dutch colony of Suriname and who became exceedingly rich.

Some years after he sold the palace in 1752, he owned four coffee plantations with more than 200,000 coffee trees, 200 sugar cane fields and (yes, you expected it!) more than 450 slaves.

In the mid 19th century Princess Sophie, daughter of King William II, lived here.

The building is a state monument and used as a prestigious office building.

© Villa Next Door 2019

All pictures were taken in March 2017

 

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #80

Façade of a house with apartments and a shop on the ground floor, Wagenstraat.

The white plastered probably late 19th century gable with apartment windows is not very interesting.

The shop front however, maybe even modernised not long after, is exceptionally colourful and elegant, with tiles, coloured glass and fine carpentry and it is a small miracle it survived the decades.

It is rather bewildering that it doesn’t have any monumental status (either municipal or state), or are there too many recent restorations?

© Villa Next Door 2019

All pictures were taken in March 2017

 

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #79

Façade of a narrow building with shop front and apartments, Wagenstraat, built around 1900 in the then prevailing and somewhat pompous mishmash of neo-styles, which seems to reflect the self-satisfaction of a conservative middle class.

Later on as the space for a shop became too small for modern times, it was connected to the ground floor of the neighbouring building, also bringing changes to the shop front, which was redesigned some years ago to its present quasi-elegant and rather cheapish state.

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #78

The railway line from Amsterdam to Rotterdam via The Hague was built in the mid nineteenth century, east of the city, outside the then built-up area.

Nowadays, of course, there are many residential and industrial areas around and east of the railway.

These urban developments have caused many traffic problems, and here are some pictures of one of the solutions.

This is the tramway tunnel and crossing, just south of Hollands Spoor railway station, under and along the railroad, built in 1995.

The whole complex exists of a tunnel, a viaduct and ramps.

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #77

Façade of an apartment block, Dunne Bierkade, originally first half of the 19th century.

It underwent some changes, most notably in converting the ground floor into a restaurant.

For a long time the house served as temporary lodgings for the homeless or the penniless and its ground floor as a restaurant for the less well to do.

Since 2009 it housed the reputable vegetarian restaurant De Zon (The Sun), which closed its doors last summer.

It has been replaced afresh by a new restaurant recently.

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

 

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #76

Office building Casuariestraat corner Bleijenburg.

Built during the first half of the 1970s, it is a typical example of modernist property development architecture.

It is anonymous and simple in its concept, not designed for a certain public function, but as a skeleton to earn money with.

In spite of that there is a quaint kind of elegance in the façade with its regular relief-like vertical ribs.

It’s a pity the surface of the concrete has got a tan; originally whitish grey, now it is like essentialist modernity’s old age (also with the somehow very postmodern quasi-old fashioned lanterns, placed more recently on the pavement).

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

 

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/