Façades of The Hague #137

Bridge in Laan van Meerdervoort over the Verversingskanaal (Drain Channel) in between Conradkade and Suezkade, usually called Conradbrug (Conrad Bridge).

In 1937 this bridge was built to give a more solid base for the increasing and heavier car traffic in The Hague’s main western thoroughfare.

In the background Cornerhouse

The bridge was designed by Antoon Pet (1885-1954) who, as a structural engineer and architect, was a civil servant in The Hague from 1919 until 1951.

Right in the background the first floors of Panoramaflat

It is a very robust bridge and at the time it was the biggest bridge (at a hundred feet) in The Hague.

It is still a local landmark, as are the two modernist buildings at the north side of the bridge: Cornerhouse (Jan Grijpma, 1929) and Panoramaflat (Piet Zanstra, 1962).

The bridge is embellished with different features, like a strange place inscribed with MANNEN (MEN), which may remind you of a forgotten war monument, but which are probably the remains of a public toilet. [Scroll down for a reaction by Casper de Weerd]

The bridge has also been provided with some sculptures, which was a fine tradition before WWII.

At the north side is a sculpture by Joop van Lunteren (1882-1958) of a boy with a toy sailboat made of a Dutch clog.

Wooden shoes were still in common use by the time.

A boy making a toy sailboat can be seen as a symbol of human, in particular Dutch and male endeavour.

It adds to the symbolism of the then modern bridge as well.

In the middle of the bridge is a monumental granite sculpture by Dirk Wolbers (1890-1957) called Veilig in’t verkeer (Safe in Traffic).

It represents a mother ready to steer her daughter and son through the busy traffic.

The traffic itself is symbolised by two small toy-like cars.

She stands there as an attractive young mother preparing her children for life in modern traffic in particular and in modern times in general.

As such they cross the bridge towards the future.

As for Wolbers himself: he died in a car crash.

At the south side of the bridge is another sculpture by Van Lunteren, representing a girl with a rabbit.

As a pendant of the boy with the sailboat at the other side, she obviously symbolises feminine compassion with creatures that need our care.

As such the whole bridge has become a symbol of modernity with traditions that have changed as a result of that modernity.

© Villa Next Door 2021

All pictures were taken in March 2017.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Art in corona times 82b. Sonsbeek 20→24, Arnhem, Sonsbeek and Zypendaal Parks

THIS IS PART 2 OF 2 OF A TOUR OF SONSBEEK 20→24. PART 2 IS A TOUR OF SONSBEEK AND ZYPENDAAL PARKS. CLICK HERE TO SEE PART 1 ABOUT THE CITY CENTRE.

The Black Archives – Villa Sonsbeek

Continuation of a visit i made to Sonsbeek 20→24, Arnhem to write a review for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the review in VLR (in Dutch)

The Black Archives – Villa Sonsbeek

Due to time shortage (and to the rainy weather) i only made pictures of a limited number of presentations.

HISK Students – Sonsbeek Park

As i have written already quite extensively about the show in VLR, i just leave you with the pictures, without comments.

HISK Students – Sonsbeek Park
HISK Students – Sonsbeek Park
HISK Students – Sonsbeek Park
Mae-ling Lokko, Gustavo Crembil – Sonsbeek Park
Mae-ling Lokko, Gustavo Crembil – Sonsbeek Park
Mae-ling Lokko, Gustavo Crembil – Sonsbeek Park
Mae-ling Lokko, Gustavo Crembil – Sonsbeek Park
Olu Oguibe – Sonsbeek Park
Olu Oguibe – Sonsbeek Park
Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Erika Hock – Sonsbeek Park
Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Erika Hock – Sonsbeek Park
Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Erika Hock – Sonsbeek Park
Jennifer Tee – Sonsbeek Park
Jennifer Tee – Sonsbeek Park
Jennifer Tee – Sonsbeek Park
Jennifer Tee – Sonsbeek Park
Jennifer Tee – Sonsbeek Park
Jennifer Tee – Sonsbeek Park
raumlabor – Sonsbeek Park
raumlabor – Sonsbeek Park
raumlabor – Sonsbeek Park
raumlabor – Sonsbeek Park
raumlabor – Sonsbeek Park
raumlabor – Sonsbeek Park
Werker Collective, Gleb Maiboroda, studio bonbon – Zypendaal Park
Werker Collective, Gleb Maiboroda, studio bonbon – Zypendaal Park
Werker Collective, Gleb Maiboroda, studio bonbon – Zypendaal Park
Justine Gaga – Zypendaal Park
Justine Gaga – Zypendaal Park
Justine Gaga – Zypendaal Park
Farkhondeh Shahroudi – Zypendaal Park
Farkhondeh Shahroudi – Zypendaal Park

Click here to read the review in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch)

Farkhondeh Shahroudi – Zypendaal Park

THIS IS WHERE PART 2 OF 2 ENDS. CLICK HERE TO SEE PART 1

Now that you’ve come here, you might as well subscribe to Villa Next Door (top right of the page)!

(Right click to enlarge pictures)

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© Villa Next Door 2021

Contents of all photographs courtesy to all artists and the curatorial team of Sonsbeek 20→24, Arnhem

Bertus Pieters

VILLA NEXT DOOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY ADVERTISING ON THIS PAGE!!

Art in corona times 82a. Sonsbeek 20→24, Arnhem. Part 1: City centre

THIS IS PART 1 OF 2 ABOUT SONSBEEK 20→24. PART 1 IS A TOUR IN THE CITY CENTRE. CLICK HERE TO SEE PART 2 ABOUT SONSBEEK AND ZYPENDAAL PARKS.    

Oscar Murillo – St Eusebius Church

I visited Arnhem to write a review for Villa La Repubblica about the Sonsbeek 20→24 show. Click here to read the review in VLR (in Dutch).

Oscar Murillo – St Eusebius Church

Due to time shortage i only made pictures of a limited number of presentations.

Oscar Murillo – St Eusebius Church

As i have written already quite extensively about the show in VLR, i just leave you with the pictures, without comments.

front Ibrahim Mahama; back Antonio José Guzman – St Eusebius Church
Ibrahim Mahama – St Eusebius Church
Ibrahim Mahama – St Eusebius Church
Ibrahim Mahama – St Eusebius Church
Ibrahim Mahama – St Eusebius Church
Antonio José Guzman – St Eusebius Church
Antonio José Guzman – St Eusebius Church
Antonio José Guzman – St Eusebius Church
Mithu Sen – St Eusebius Church
Mithu Sen – St Eusebius Church
Mithu Sen – St Eusebius Church
Mithu Sen – St Eusebius Church
Ndidi Dike – De Groen Collection
Ndidi Dike – De Groen Collection
Ndidi Dike – De Groen Collection
Ndidi Dike – De Groen Collection
Libita Sibungu – De Groen Collection
Libita Sibungu – De Groen Collection
Libita Sibungu – De Groen Collection
Ndidi Dike – De Groen Collection
Ndidi Dike – De Groen Collection
Omer Wasim – De Groen Collection
Omer Wasim – De Groen Collection
Omer Wasim – De Groen Collection
Omer Wasim – De Groen Collection
Anne Duk Hee Jordan – De Groen Collection
Alida Ymele – Showroom Arnhem
Alida Ymele – Showroom Arnhem
Alida Ymele – Showroom Arnhem
Willem de Rooij presents Pierre Verger – Showroom Arnhem
Buhlebezwe Siwani – Showroom Arnhem
Buhlebezwe Siwani – Showroom Arnhem
Kudzanai-Violet Hwami – Showroom Arnhem
Ellen Gallagher – Waalse Kerk
Ellen Gallagher – Waalse Kerk
Olu Oguibe – Gele Rijders Plein

Click here to read the review in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch)

Olu Oguibe – Gele Rijders Plein

THIS IS WHERE PART 1 OF 2 ENDS. CLICK HERE TO SEE PART 2

Now that you’ve come here, you might as well subscribe to Villa Next Door (top right of the page)!

(Right click to enlarge pictures)

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© Villa Next Door 2021

Contents of all photographs courtesy to all artists and the curatorial team of Sonsbeek 20→24, Arnhem

Bertus Pieters

VILLA NEXT DOOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY ADVERTISING ON THIS PAGE!!

Façades of The Hague #135

Office building, Lange Voorhout.

It was designed by architect Jo Limburg (1864-1945) and built in 1910 for Martinus Nijhoff publishers and booksellers.

Limburg was an architect from The Hague and responsible for some remarkable buildings in this city, such as Herengracht 9 (1915-1916), Maerlant-Lyceum (1926), the building in which the present day restaurant of the Mauritshuis Museum is (1930), and a few others in which Limburg’s development from a more or less neo-classicist to a more modernist style can be seen.

As a Jew he was forced to go into hiding during World War II. He probably died while in hiding during the Bombing of the Bezuidenhout in 1945.

This particular façade is also a token of the lifelong friendship of Limburg and artist Willem van Konijnenburg (1868-1943) who designed the six remarkable sculptures which decorate the building.

There doesn’t seem to be a particular meaning to the individual figures. (If there is, please tell)

They all look neo-renaissance and they may be connected to thinking, philosophy, wisdom, priesthood, etc. but they carry no attributes as such.

Nowadays only the façade of the building remains as a state monument, the building behind it is new and it accommodates the Onderzoeksraad Voor Veiligheid (OVV; Dutch Safety Board).

© Villa Next Door 2021

All pictures were taken in March 2017.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Art in corona times 73. Voorhout Monumentaal 2021; Lange Voorhout, The Hague

Ewerdt Hilgemann: Double

To write a review for Villa La Repubblica about Voorhout Monumentaal 2021, i went to Lange Voorhout to see the public sculpture show there. Click here to read the review in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch).

Ewerdt Hilgemann: Double

As it happened only two sculptures in the show – by Ewerdt Hilgemann (1938) and by Joncquil (1973) – were worth taking some more pictures of.

Ewerdt Hilgemann: Double

One of Hilgemann’s so-called Implosion Sculptures is on show.

Ewerdt Hilgemann: Double

These are welded geometrical shapes, which are vacuumed.

Ewerdt Hilgemann: Double

As such they look like post-modern statements about a worn-out modernism, where chance plays a role again.

Ewerdt Hilgemann: Double

Surrounding shapes and colours mix in the crumpled surface of the sculpture, making it part of the surroundings itself.

Joncquil: Le moule qui rit

Joncquil’s Le moule qui rit (The laughing mould) –a title derived from the French cheese spread La vache qui rit (The laughing cow) –  refers to both le moule, French for “the mould,” and la moule, French for “the mussel.”

Joncquil: Le moule qui rit

As such it is also referring to Marcel Broodthaers (1924-1976) and his Pots of Mussels. Of course Lange Voorhout is full of shells, moulds if you wish, but as an absurdist object in The Hague’s chicest avenue Le moule qui rit also works very well, apart from its references.

Joncquil: Le moule qui rit

Click here to read the article in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch).

Joncquil: Le moule qui rit

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© Villa Next Door 2021

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Ewerdt Hilgemann, Joncquil and Pulchri Studio, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #130

Due to a navigational mistake and bad weather the British RAF bombed residential areas and the northern entrance of the city centre of The Hague on 3 March 1945, just two months before the end of the German occupation..

It was hard for a city that had just survived one of its cruellest winters in terms of sheer cold and hunger.

Many lost their homes and the city centre itself lost part of one of its poshest streets, Korte Voorhout  

In fact the whole plot in between Korte Voorhout, Schouwburgstraat, Casuariestraat and Prinsessegracht was damaged and partly in ruins.

It is characteristic for a small city like The Hague that they were the ruins and damaged buildings of a court of justice, a theatre, a church, a jail, the Royal Dutch Automobile Club (KNAC) and a clinic, amongst others.

After the war the government wanted to have a new ministry, preferably a double one, of Justice and Finance, but decision making was stalled.

Only in the 1970s the present Ministry of Finance (Ministerie van Financiën) was built.

The huge building can be seen as symbolic for the power of the Ministry of Finance within the government.

More than ever it became clear that any political idea had a price tag, especially when society became socio-economically more and more sophisticated.

The building was designed by state architect Jo Vegter (1906-1982; who was not just responsible for modernist building but also for the restoration of quite a few old Frisian churches) and his assistant Mart Bolten (1916-2002) in strikingly modern brutalist style.

When in 1977 i went to study at the Royal Academy, just a few steps away from the Ministry, it was still a remarkably forbidding concrete palace.

The outlook of the concrete itself was only softened a bit by the prints of wood structure in it.

It was the impressive fortification of the state’s financial power.

Any Minister of Finance residing in that building must have had the idea of being a king in both a palace and a fortification.

In fact the inside of the building was a lot softer than that.

As art students we could see that, when the ministry offered rooms to show some of our graduation works, as the Royal Academy had a notorious lack of space at the time.

Enlightened civil servants would walk around amongst the works of these students who were training for a financially completely irresponsible future.

I’m not quite sure if the civil servants were really interested, but to them it was undoubtedly a nice diversion just before the summer break.

Coming to think of it, it wouldn’t be a bad idea if the Ministry would again give some space to students, who, for instance, would like to graduate with a performance or something like that.

Preferably with participation (obligatory!) of the audience.  (Surely, it would be beneficial to the dialogue between art and society if students were able to show their works in both public and private institutions and in public space around the Royal Academy. But that’s probably easier said than done)

Although the building had a very modernist outlook, it was technically outdated within a few decades.

There were no double glazed windows and the whole inner climate had to be completely renewed to make the building more cost-effective.

The normal Dutch reflex in such cases is to abandon the building, keep the workers in a temporary but even worse place for years, and make plans to build a new and far more prestigious architectural colossus somewhere else.

Usually, making plans will cost quite a while, sometimes years, but in case of this building it was decided it was to be refurbished, and reused.

The uniqueness of the building played a role in that decision too.

It was decided that the original design would be maintained.

However, a lot of postmodern glass was used to give the building a more open character.

Also the courtyard has been opened to the public.

Redesigning was done by Meyer and Van Schooten architects.

The official entrance at Korte Voorhout has been made more welcoming with colours by monumental artist Jan van der Ploeg (1959).

But don’t be mistaken: any political novelty may fall when civil servants in this palace strongly advise their minister that costs and benefits of the idea are not at all in balance, if the minister didn’t already have that idea.

After all, the philosophy is still that money should be spent on those who have the power to spend a lot themselves, while some drops of their honey will then trickle down to those living in the mud.

However, with different social and political crises at the same time, and a review of the Dutch civil service, that might become less normal than it sounds. Let’s hope so, or at least, let’s hope for the better.

© Villa Next Door 2021

All pictures were taken in March 2017.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #72 onwards: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Art in corona times 45. Rearrangement of The Hague Sculpture Gallery by The Hague Council of Children, Grote Marktstraat, The Hague

Alderman Van Asten and The Hague Council of Children, 26 October 2020

On Monday October 26th The Hague Council of Children called on alderman of culture Robert van Asten to keep art accessible and affordable for everyone and to show more art in the city.

Of course i can’t agree more with the children, and i think it’s very moving.

In addition, the Children’s Council selected eleven favourite statues from the Sculpture Gallery in the city centre (the so-called Pedestal Project) and rearranged them in Grote Marktstraat in between Spui and Wagenstraat in cooperation with Stroom Den Haag.

The only conclusion can be that the kids did a good curatorial job.

It’s basic but sound, straight forward, lively and multicoloured.

Alderman Van Asten and The Hague Children’s Council and Berry Holslag’s ‘Observer’, being photographed by the press, 26 October 2020
Femmy Otten

When Stroom introduced Femmy Otten’s statue, it did so in a less crowded spot, anxious about the reactions of the public.

Femmy Otten
Femmy Otten

The children didn’t have such qualms and placed the sculpture right at the beginning of the commercial hub of Grote Marktstraat.

Ingrid Mol
Ingrid Mol
Ingrid Mol

Ingrid Mol’s sculpture is in fact itself a concoction by children given to the artist and so it couldn’t be missed in a choice made by children, also as a comment on consumership.

Berry Holslag
Berry Holslag

Berry Holslag’s sculpture is placed so as that it will look at you if you leave the cinema.

Rob Birza
Rob Birza
Rob Birza

Rob Birza’s sculpture was chosen because it combines Hindu and Dutch traditional cultures,

Famke van Wijk
Famke van Wijk

while Famke van Wijk’s work has a partly Christian content.

André van de Wijdeven

André van de Wijdeven’s elegant pink sculpture was chosen because if you’re looking at it from the restaurant on the second floor of the department store you will see the inscription with the title on top of it.

Jan Snoeck
Jan Snoeck
Hans van Bentem

Jan Snoeck’s and Hans van Bentem’s works were chosen just for the fun of them.

David Bade
David Bade

David Bade’s Calimero sculpture was placed in front of a chic department store as, according to the children, you shouldn’t feel sorry for yourself, and make the best of it.

Atelier Van Lieshout
Atelier Van Lieshout
Atelier Van Lieshout

To many Atelier Van Lieshout’s sculpture feels a bit awkward and scary but the children thought it was interesting that it looks at you from all sides.

Tony van de Vorst

Tony van de Vorst’s Friends closes the sequence.

Tony van de Vorst

When it was added to the collection some years ago it caused a stir amongst narrow minded politicians who objected to the girls wearing head scarves, but for the children they are just what they are: friends.

Tony van de Vorst

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© Villa Next Door 2020

Contents of all photographs courtesy to (the estate of) the artists, Haagse Raad van Kinderen and Stroom, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

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Art in corona times 41. Huang Yong Ping, Ling Zhi Helicopters; The Hague

I visited Ypenburg (en enclave of The Hague in between neighbouring municipalities) and its new public work of art by Huang Yong Ping (1954-2019) called Ling Zhi Helicopters to write an article for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the article (in Dutch).

As i have written quite extensively about the work in VLR, i just leave you here with some impressions of it, with the strong recommendation to visit it, as it is quite impressive.

Click here to read the review in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch)

Now that you’ve come here, you might as well subscribe to Villa Next Door (top right of the page)!

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© Villa Next Door 2020

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the estate of Huang Yong Ping and Stroom, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

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Art in corona times 6. Hoogtij #61 (High Tide Festival #61), The Hague

Usually Villa Next Door doesn’t pay much attention to events like Hoogtij (Dutch for ‘High Tide’). Hoogtij is a seasonal Hague event – always on a Friday night – in which most commercial and non-commercial galleries in the city are open to the public. Gallerists and artists are present and there are always many special events. Due to the circumstances this couldn’t take place yesterday night, so the organisation decided to go online. 22 venues took part in this edition.

So i sat down in front of my computer to see everything. Most of the material can still be seen on the internet. A special event was an interview by Marie Jeanne de Rooij with Jane Huldman, sister, mother and grandmother to many an artist in The Hague.

It is a warm blooded interview, recommended for those who are interested in modern and contemporary art history of The Hague and the nitty-gritty of, amongst others, the Dutch art subsidy system. The interview is in Dutch and  it is not subtitled.

I hopped alphabetically through The Hague in order not to miss anything, so i started at …ism which showed Museum Guards, in which the inhabitants of …ism perform as guards of their own house and collection, staring at you blankly in their own paradise.

1646 has a delightful presentation by Afra Eisma  of her exhibition Feline Whispers which had to close down because of the corona crisis, but which can now be experienced digitally.

Undoubtedly hers is one of the most moving Hoogtij presentations.

Victoria Kieffer’s presentation at Aether Haga is interesting for its content, but why didn’t she present it in French with English subtitles and with more creativity in the visual materials?

Baracca gives a trailer, or rather an announcement of its 2015 project Inside Job, which can be seen on Yvo van der Vat’s YouTube channel. It will take you more than an hour to see the whole movie.

At De Helena Hanna de Haan and Rik Buter have been working on a charcoal wall drawing, improvising on and reacting to each other’s work.

At Dürst Britt & Mayhew gallerist Jaring Dürst Britt shows you around in its first lustrum exhibition Vèf Jaaaah, with works by all the gallery’s artists. If you switch to the gallery’s Facebook and Instagram pages you can see Alexander Mayhew talking about the different works of art (in English). I reported about the exhibition here.

Galerie Maurits van de Laar presents a tour by artist and curator of its present exhibition Christie van der Haak.

As Christie has been a much valued teacher at the Royal Academy in The Hague she will be to many – like Jane Huldman – a kind of sister, mother and grandmother of the arts. It is a wonderful presentation in Dutch. I reported about the exhibition here.

At the Grafische Werkplaats (Graphic Studio) Nina van Dijk and Cedric ter Bals show you around (in English) in the exhibition Slechte verhalen fikken niet (Bad Stories Don’t Burn) while Christiaan Schoonenberg presents his own story.

All done in a wonderfully spontaneous way (at least, that is how it looks like).

At Heden artist Thijs Jaeger presents his work Four Horse Men, a small but intriguing work based on the Apocalypse. The presentation is in Dutch.

At HOK gallery, one of the very smallest in The Hague, Harold de Bree opens his own exhibition Borderlines.

His presentation is in English and there is even champagne!

At Maldoror Gallery Roeland Langendoen and Elsbeth Verheul show paintings.

Maldoror is one of the easiest accessible of the lot as it is just a shop window.

Malieveldwerk is at the Malieveld where on Saturdays you may find one or more artists experimenting. The short video is from 2013 (when snow was still a common winter feature in this country) in which the experiments are announced by Topp & Dubio. The announcement is in Dutch.

Projektruimte West end (West End Project Space) shows you around in an exhibition of paintings, drawings, photographs and objects featuring cats.

A must see for any cat lover or even not-cat lover.

Quartair presents the interactive exhibition stay-go.nl. It takes some extra clicks to get there, but it is fun.

Refunc is one of the very few venues which are digitally much better than in real, as far as i am concerned.

Those who need a reflective moment about space are well served by Henk Hubenet at Ruimtevaart with the short but fine video Circumstanced.

See Lab, itself located in far off Scheveningen, which makes it difficult to physically take part in Hoogtij, can be accessed now online with a presentation of the digital project Walking with Unimals by the artists of Pointer Studio. The project is presently on show ‘in real’ at See Lab.

In a very short presentation gallerist Alex Lebbink shows you the way to his SinArts Gallery.

It takes some extra clicking to SinArts’ own website to see the very interesting and worthwhile presentations of four artists and their works. Alex interviewed them all in English and it is a good way to get acquainted with their work. There are some short but beautiful video works and a recording of an impressive performance readily accessible as well.

Peter van Beveren’s The Archives has no short video. Why not? Surely all those books look interesting and intriguing enough, don’t they?

With a very short teaser Trixie announces its upcoming exhibition focus loslaten | ontspannen (let loose focus | relax) which takes place in June and for which you can apply in advance for a visit.

West Den Haag in “Onze Ambassade” (“Our Embassy” –  the former American Embassy) shows some slides of the four exhibitions it has at the moment.

Z Extra: Raamproject (Window Project), shows a short preview of a project by artist Yvette Teeuwen. Together with painter Casper Verborg – Yvette outside and Casper inside – they make a drawing on a window (at Heden). After some time a passer-by is also allowed to take part.

To end the evening i watched the short movie Dusk of the Harmonious Garden by Shen Wei, one of SinArts’ artists. A perfect and peaceful work to finish with!

Although these video presentations can never match the atmosphere and uniqueness of the usual Hoogtij events they are a good sign of life of the artists community in The Hague, and, as such, more venues could have taken part. Just to give a sign of life. Another good message is that most of the exhibitions are still on show “in real” and can be visited under conditions, so inquire at the websites of the galleries how you can visit them.

Click here to see all the Hoogtij presentations on its YouTube channel.

© Villa Next Door 2020

All photographs are stills / screen shots from the different presentations; courtesy to the artists, venues and the makers of the videos.

Bertus Pieters

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Art in corona times 4. Topp & Dubio in a Street, The Hague

I went on a bike ride to write an article for Villa La Repubblica about Topp & Dubio in a Street by Topp & Dubio, which can be seen at forty tram stops in town. Click here to read the article (in Dutch).

Click here for the page with a map where you can find the tram stops.

I’ve written quite extensively in VLR about the project, so i leave you here with some impressions. Take a look in your neighbourhood, i’m sure they are there as well!

© Villa Next Door 2020

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Topp & Dubio, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

VILLA NEXT DOOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY ADVERTISING ON THIS PAGE!!